Letters of a stoic(Letter V)

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I commend you and rejoice in the fact that you are persistent in your studies, and that, putting all else aside, you make it each day your endeavor to become a better man. I do not merely exhort you to keep at it; I actually beg you to do so. I warn you, however, not to act after the fashion of those who desire to be conspicuous rather than to improve, by doing things which will rouse comment as regards your dress or general way of living. Repellent attire, unkempt hair, slovenly beard, open scorn of silver dishes, a couch on the bare earth, and any other perverted forms of self-display, are to be avoided. The mere name of philosophy, however quietly pursued, is an object of sufficient scorn; and what would happen if we should begin to separate ourselves from the customs of our fellow-men? Inwardly, we ought to be different in all respects, but our exterior should conform to society. Do not wear too fine, nor yet too frowzy, a toga. One needs no silver plate, encrusted and embossed in solid gold; but we should not believe the lack of silver and gold to be proof of the simple life. Let us try to maintain a higher standard of life than that of the multitude, but not a contrary standard; otherwise, we shall frighten away and repel the very persons whom we are trying to improve. We also bring it about that they are unwilling to imitate us in anything, because they are afraid lest they might be compelled to imitate us in everything.

The first thing which philosophy undertakes to give is fellow-feeling with all men; in other words, sympathy and sociability. We part company with our promise if we are unlike other men. We must see to it that the means by which we wish to draw admiration be not absurd and odious. Our motto, as you know, is “Live according to Nature”; but it is quite contrary to nature to torture the body, to hate unlabored elegance, to be dirty on purpose, to eat food that is not only plain, but disgusting and forbidding. Just as it is a sign of luxury to seek out dainties, so it is madness to avoid that which is customary and can be purchased at no great price. Philosophy calls for plain living, but not for penance; and we may perfectly well be plain and neat at the same time. This is the mean of which I approve; our life should observe a happy medium between the ways of a sage and the ways of the world at large; all men should admire it, but they should understand it also.

Well then, shall we act like other men? Shall there be no distinction between ourselves and the world? “Yes, a very great one; let men find that we are unlike the common herd, if they look closely. If they visit us at home, they should admire us. rather than our household appointments, he is a great man who uses earthenware dishes as if they were silver; but he is equally great who uses silver as if it were earthenware. It is the sign of an unstable mind not to be able to endure riches.”

But I wish to share with you to-day’s profit also. I find in the writings of our Hecato that the limiting of desires helps also to cure fears: “Cease to hope,” he says, “and you will cease to fear.” “But how, you will reply, “can things so different go side by side?” In this way, my dear Lucilius: though they do seem at variance, yet they are really united. Just as the same chain fastens the prisoner and the soldier who guards him, so hope and fear, dissimilar as they are, keep step together; fear follows hope. I am not surprised that they proceed in this way; each alike belongs to a mind that is in suspense, a mind that is fretted by looking forward to the future. But the chief cause of both these ills is that we do not adapt ourselves to the present, but send our thoughts a long way ahead. And so foresight, the noblest blessing of the human race, becomes perverted. Beasts avoid the dangers which they see, and when they have escaped them are free from care; but we men torment ourselves over that which is to come as well as over that which is past. Many of our blessings bring bane to us; for memory recalls the tortures of fear, while foresight anticipates them. The present alone can make no man wretched. Farewell.

Seneca

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What the bible says about violence and Christianity

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4FOEJhHQ3bc

This should lay to rest to so called pacifist heresy of Jesus and of Christianity. Turning the other cheek is not what many Christians think.

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April 21, 2014 · 1:40 am

The “Double Standard” Double Standard

One is not, in the Christian church, ever allowed to criticize sexual immorality in a woman.  This is an unwritten rule, the 11th commandment, enforced by what I call “the double standard” double standard.

It works like this:  Any time you point out that a woman is being sexually immoral, you will instantly get a reply from an exasperated Christian woman or a male Christian white knight, exclaiming, “But where are the men!  Why isn’t anyone talking about the men who sleep with these women?! Why is there this double standard?”

I agree: There is a double standard.  And it is based on the false perception of an opposite double standard.  People only ever decry a “double standard” when we talk about female sin.  Never when we talk about male sin.  This is itself the very definition of a double standard.

Everyone is saying “Why is no one talking about these men?!” Which, ironically, means everyone is talking about these men.   In fact, they only ever blame the man.  And if anyone mentions the woman shares equal blame, they then reply (after having already blamed the man), “But what about the men?!”

This is not only absurd, but logically fallacious.  Now, to this charge the feminist responds, “Logic is for boys.  They’re stupid.  Throw rocks at them.”

But for the rest of us who realize that logic is the reason we’re communicating with computers and iPads instead of still drawing pictures on cave walls, we see the fallacy immediately:  If A and B both engage in an immoral behavior, and I state that A is immoral for engaging in that behavior, this does not mean I am somehow stating that B is morally justified.  That is, simply because I say that Hitler was evil for murdering 6 million innocent Jews, doesn’t mean I’m excusing his junior officers.  Nor Neville Chamberlain for appeasing him.  Nor the German people for voting for him.  If I condemn Hitler, I am not at the same time justifying the Turks for the Armenian Genocide, or Stalin for his murderous purges.  Only an idiot would say that I am.

But they don’t teach logic in schools anymore.  It’s more important to teach young girls how to put condems(sic) on cucumbers.

In a later post I will explain why I believe this “double standard” double standard exists.

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The case against teenagers

THis book describes why teenage is a social construct. Essentially the concept of teenager did not exist before the 40ths and is only a means for marketers to divide up the population into segments. This book argues against infantilizing young people.

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February 8, 2014 · 8:39 am

Miyamoto Musashi’s 21-Point Checklist

infowarrior1:

21 points of minimalist masculine lifestyle.

Originally posted on The Red Pill Journal:

Samurai One Miyamoto Musashi

“If you wish to control others, you must first control yourself.”
― Miyamoto Musashi

In keeping with my fixation on all things Japanese, I did a bit of reading on Miyamoto Musashi. Having already read the Book of Five Rings (which I greatly enjoyed) I wanted to know more about the man. He’s known as the unbeaten samurai, having won over 60 duels before losing to what was probably thoracic cancer, in his sixties. He’s a fascinating guy with his share of legends.

One of my favorites was the story of his island duel.

Musashi rowed a boat to the dueling point, riding the tide, and carved his weapon, a wooden practice sword, out of one of his oars. Then he beat his opponent to death, before making his escape on the receding tide. Supposedly, he used the sun to his advantage, blinding his opponent as he parried.

But…

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Since I have my exams this week I will leave with this

Take my money now!!!!

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January 26, 2014 · 8:16 am

How to survive the coming collapse

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December 7, 2012 · 11:43 pm